Aug
07

Aging in Place: How to Design a House That Will Fit Your Needs in the Future

Investing in a retirement home is truly a wonderful way to spend your hard-earned money. Your main priority is going to be finding a suitable place that offers an environment to enjoy their later years, but also an environment that can offer them enough care and support.

As the nation’s population ages, accessibility has become an important goal for many new-home buyers seeking to ensure that their homes will continue to fit their needs — or those of aging loved ones — in the future.

Homeowners who plan on aging in place — remain in the home of their choice for as long as they’re able — should incorporate the principles of universal design into the home. The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) defines universal design as “the design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design.”

(C) Senior Community Services

(C) Senior Community Services

Plan for Future Needs

Karen Smith is an occupational therapist who holds the Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) designation from the NAHB. When Smith purchased a new home about a year ago, she decided it was time to start to age in place herself.

Smith purchased a 2,000-square-foot home in Dagsboro, Del., from Ryan Homes. The house has two stories, but the 61-year-old Smith uses the upstairs bedroom and bath for her home office, preferring to have her office space separated from the main living quarters of her home. “I thought the upstairs could become a caretaker’s quarters if that possibility happened,” she says. “Or for family members who come to visit who are able-bodied.”

Read more: https://www.newhomesource.com/resourcecenter/articles/aging-in-place-how-to-design-a-house-that-will-fit-your-needs-in-the-future

 

Speak Your Mind

*